This Woman Found Something Moving On Her Costco Salmon

salmon worm

What exactly is the protocol for finding a wriggling specimen on your “fresh” Costco salmon? One Twitter user who shops at a Costco in Fontana, California, found a tiny transparent worm on her slice of salmon, and the internet has entered into battle mode.

Twitter user @LizaMichelleA posted a video to her feed on June 5th, showing off the creepy critter she found living on her fresh fish. She explained that she tried to return the salmon, but rather than give her money back, Costco gave her a cash card to buy another package of salmon.

“Soooo this Happened yesterday during Dinner Prep: Salmon from @Costco on SIERRA in Fontana CA.!” Liza Michelle wrote. “The wildest part? THEY KEPT IT HUSH HUSH & Gave me A Cash card “So I Can repurchase ANOTHER ONE” they should be pulling this from their SHELVES!” She also tagged a few local news stations including Fox 11 Los Angeles and ABC7.

Although one would expect a total freakout over the grossness of the situation, most people who responded to her video were on Costco’s side. According to several Twitter users, finding worms on fresh fish is a fairly common occurrence.

Um… there goes our hankering for sushi.

“Roundworm,” one Twitter user responded. “It’s normal for them to be in fish and is why you need to cook fish to a certain temperature.”

And unfortunately, she’s right.

According to SeafoodHealthFacts.org, “Parasites are a natural occurrence, not contamination. They are as common in fish as insects are in fruits and vegetables. Parasites do not present a health concern in thoroughly cooked fish.”

The roundworm, or nematode, on Liza Michelle’s salmon is one of the most common parasites found on marine fish. Remember these guys, everybody?

[fm_youtube url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1YiIiPUQR8"]

The site explains that these parasites don’t pose a problem unless they reside on fish served uncooked, and all fish used for sushi should be frozen for at least seven days to kill off the parasites.

Long story short: if Liza Michelle simply cooked her salmon at 145°F for at least 15 seconds, any crisis would have been averted. There’s truly no need for concern.

More than enough people filled her in on the commonality of nematodes on fresh fish. We’re glad she got some good feedback.

For some, this is the reason they don’t mess around with fish. And TBH, that’s understandable.

If you’re one such person, it seems that Costco fish are no strangers to these parasites. Others told Liza Michelle they experienced something similar in the past.

In fact, in 2018, a woman from Richmond, California found a parasite in her Costco salmon, according to local news KRON. She, too, wasn’t thrilled with the discovery, despite learning that parasites are common on fresh fish.

“I don’t want to eat it, I want to take it back,” she told KRON. “We bought some other seafood. We are taking it all back.”

Maybe this is something we should all take into consideration.

However, no matter where you buy your fresh fish, you could run into a nematode. It’s just a fact of life.

It’s gross. But there’s nothing you can really do. Just freeze it, fry it, or don’t buy it in the first place.

Vegans are over here laughing. Sorry we called you crazy, guys.

So, no. Costco is not to blame. Next time you buy fish at Costco, or anywhere else, be sure to cook it or freeze it before diving in.

Did you like it?

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 4.8 / 5. Vote count: 302

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Enjoy Your $19.99 FREE Copy of Our Digital Cookbook!

Enjoy our FREE Digital
Cookbook as Our Way of
Saying Thank You!

I agree to the storing and processing of my personal data by So Yummy as described by the Privacy Policy.

Get your So Yummy Cookbook digital copy - for Free!

Enjoy surprising, smart and absolutely gorgeous home cooking recipes & tips

Thanks for subscribing!

Your Cookbook Awaits in Your Inbox